Pro Training On-Site Syllabus

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Standard® Pro Training On-Site is a reality-based technician training program focused on the needs of the aftermarket professional automotive technician. For scheduling and availability, contact your local Standard® representative or submit an inquiry using our contact form. Here's what on-site seminars will be available this year:

New Topics for 2020

Automotive HVAC Diagnosis and Service 

Vehicle manufacturers must comply with environmental regulations that directly affect the design and of the HVAC system.  As R-1234yf becomes the mainstream refrigerant, technicians must adapt to the differences in service and diagnosis.  More complex controls are networked together to operate the HVAC system, and these must be part of the diagnosis.  Technicians must understand the entire system to consistently provide their customers with the comfort level they demand.

The goal of this class is to refresh technician knowledge of refrigeration principles as they relate to diagnosing a fault in the refrigerant portion of the HVAC system.  Effective diagnosis, component replacement, and service will be demonstrated on R-1234yf vehicles.  We will teach system and schematic analysis to improve the technician’s diagnosis of cooling fan, compressor, and in-car controls which all play a role in keeping the customer happy.

After completing this class, a technician will be able to:

  • Identify new technologies and their impact on HVAC
  • Properly diagnose and service R-1234yf systems
  • Properly replace HVAC components
  • Perform correct HVAC service
  • Diagnose cooling fan and airflow issues
  • Diagnose in-car HVAC controls

Gasoline Direct Injection 

Gasoline direct injection is used on most new vehicles and requires a different approach to diagnosis and service. GDI systems have specific failures and require an understanding of how they work and how to test them when they set a code. In this class, we will dig into these systems and demonstrate common failures, code diagnosis, scan data interpretation, and service procedures. We will diagnose broken vehicles and help you to streamline your diagnosis of these popular systems.

The goal of this class is to prepare the aftermarket technician for diagnosing and repairing gasoline direct injection systems safely and correctly.

After completing this class, a technician will:

  • Understand the evolution of fuel systems
  • Understand the benefits of direct injection
  • Understand the direct-port combo injection systems purpose
  • Understand direct injection fueling modes
  • Understand and be able to diagnose the low-pressure system
  • Understand and be able to diagnose the high-pressure system
  • Be aware of the primary cause of carbon buildup on the intake valve and how to address it
  • Be able to properly handle direct injection components during repairs to other systems
  • Be able to replace fuel injectors or their seals
  • Be able to replace the high-pressure pump
  • Understand the complex control of fuel injectors and how to scope the control circuits

ABS & Stability Controls

Today's modern vehicles are equipped with sophisticated stability controls. Anti-lock braking, traction control, and enhanced stability systems work together to provide safety and performance to vehicle occupants. Multiple modules communicating over high-speed networks are needed for these systems to operate. Active wheel speed sensors can make the diagnosis more complex. There is a growing market for the service and repair of these complex systems.

The goal of this class is to enable the aftermarket technician to diagnose, service, and repair ABS and stability control components and systems. We will examine these systems in detail and demonstrate proper service procedures and diagnostics through diagnostic scenarios on real-world vehicles.

After completing this class, the technician will be able to:

  • Identify ABS and Stability Control components and their operation
  • Determine the cause of symptoms such as warning lights, incorrect ABS activation, loss of power, and others cause by these systems
  • Diagnose a lack of communication problem
  • Identify common failures and avoid service pitfalls
  • Diagnose passive and active wheel speed sensors
  • Analyze scan data to determine ABS operation

Push Button Start Systems 

Passive entry and start systems using a “smart key” have been available on select vehicles for many years now. These systems allow a driver to leave the key in their pocket while both entering and starting the vehicle. The smart key communicates wirelessly with a receiver which then communicates with other modules over a wired network. These systems are typically very reliable, but when they fail and a vehicle will not start, technicians will need to understand how they work to diagnose them.

The goal of this class is to prepare the aftermarket technician to be ready to diagnose and repair push button start systems.  Technicians will learn to differentiate between a smart key system fault and a module-controlled starter fault. Technicians will learn the core components involved with all push button start systems, as well as the OE specific components and their operation on four different vehicles.

After completing this class, the technician will be able to:

  • Understand module controlled starting systems
  • Identify the core components of a push button start system
  • Understand the necessary inputs to allow for passive engine start
  • Identify service and repair issues
  • Diagnose wireless communication faults
  • Diagnose wired communication faults
  • Identify which part of the system has failed and create a diagnostic plan
  • Read and interpret a starting system wiring schematic

Diagnosing Modern Valve Actuation Systems 

In recent years, there have been significant changes in valve actuation systems. Variable valve timing has been used by manufacturers for over a decade, but problems can still prove to be difficult to diagnose. Variable lift, commonly used by Honda for years, is now being used by other manufacturers and poses a diagnostic issue for technicians. Displacement on-demand systems have been embraced by more manufacturers and can bring diagnostic challenges as well.

The goal of this class is to prepare the aftermarket technician to be successful in troubleshooting faults with variable cam timing, variable cam lift, and variable displacement systems. Technicians will learn how to identify these systems, understand and test their operation, and accurately diagnose problems. Technicians will also learn how the MultiAir system works and how to troubleshoot faults.

After completing this class, a technician will be able to:

  • Understand variable valve timing operation
  • Identify the components and their functions
  • Interpret cam position data in the data stream
  • Diagnose variable valve timing faults accurately
  • Understand the MultiAir system used by Chrysler
  • Identify the components and their functions
  • Diagnose MultiAir faults accurately
  • Understand variable valve lift operation and their variations
  • Understand variable cylinder displacement operation
  • Identify the components and their functions

EVAP Code Diagnosis 

Evaporative Emission control systems have undergone numerous changes over the last 20 years due to ever-tightening government regulations. The MIL light is usually the only indication of an EVAP fault and it can come on with even the slightest of leaks. This class will focus on the principles behind the EVAP onboard diagnostics and empower you to be able to solve problems regardless of the various systems you encounter. You will be able to get that light to go out and stay out.

The goal of this class is to prepare the aftermarket technician to diagnose and repair evaporative system failures regardless of the type of system being used. Technicians will understand the theory behind evaporative system operation and how various methods and devices are used to satisfy government regulations concerning leak detection and more.

After completing this class, the technician will be able to:

  • Identify the difference between pressure and vacuum
  • Understand pressure differences across an evaporative system
  • Understand the purpose and operation of the evaporative system
  • Explain the difference between various system types
  • Use multiple methods of leak detection on any system
  • Explain how evaporative systems operate on a turbocharged engine

Advanced Engine Mechanical Diagnostics 

Mechanical, or base engine faults can be difficult to diagnose. Technicians can replace the wrong parts or spend a lot of wasted time on diagnosis when the cause of the problem lies inside the engine. With the introduction of advanced valve actuation systems, the difficulty faced by technicians has grown. Fortunately, new diagnostic tools and techniques are now available to make the job easier.

The goal of this class is to prepare the aftermarket technician to use the appropriate tools to identify many base engine faults without engine teardown. In the class, we will demonstrate testing techniques using new tools such as amp probes, pressure transducers, and lab scopes to improve diagnostic speed and accuracy. We will compare the new techniques to traditional testing methods. Learning will be reinforced by working through real-world failures applying both traditional and advanced diagnostic techniques.

After attending this class, the technician will be able to:

  • Perform traditional compression tests and understand the limitations
  • Perform and evaluate a relative compression test
  • Perform and evaluate a cylinder leakage test
  • Perform a VE and engine load test
  • Perform and evaluate an intake and exhaust pressure variation test
  • Perform and evaluate an in-cylinder compression test

The Top Light Duty Diesel Problems and Solutions 

The diesel engine is a popular option when your customer needs to tow a trailer. This class will contain the latest information on common failures and solutions for light duty diesel engines used in pickup and vans. This class will include information on Cummins, Duramax, and Power Stroke. You will learn common failures and solutions for these engines. In this class, you will see diagnosis and component replacement performed on trucks from the field. Get ready to provide great service for your diesel customers.

The goal of this class is to prepare the aftermarket technician for diagnosing and repairing common problems with light duty diesel trucks. During the class, we will present tips and procedures that will enable the technician to diagnose these faults quickly and accurately.

  • After completing this class, the technician will be able to:
  • Explain combustion in a diesel engine
  • Identify two common injection system types
  • Understand the Duramax, Cummins, and Powerstroke fuel systems
  • Diagnose EGR and turbocharger failures
  • Identify SCR and DPF components and their operation
  • Be aware of common faults

Asian Import Drivability Solutions 

These popular vehicles bring numerous unique system controls and diagnostics to the table. However, misfires, codes, and other symptoms must be diagnosed. In this class, we will explore a variety of these systems which can cause faults and apply tried and true diagnostic techniques to solving real-world problems through a variety of case studies.

The goal of this class is to prepare an aftermarket technician to diagnose a variety of faults on Asian import vehicles. This will improve workflow and accuracy. During the class, we will demonstrate diagnostic procedures using basic tools the will enable the technician to diagnose these faults quickly and accurately.

After attending this class, the technician will be able to:

  • Diagnose CKP and CMP sensor faults
  • Diagnose Coil On Plug ignition systems
  • Understand and diagnose Air/Fuel Ratio sensors
  • Perform EVAP leak testing on Asian vehicles
  • Diagnose CAN bus faults on Asian vehicles

GM Engine Controls- New Technologies 

The General Motors fleet of vehicles has been changing rapidly over the last half dozen years. Smaller and more efficient engines now dominate a fleet of downsized vehicles. At the same time, full-size gasoline pickup trucks are still very popular. Producing vehicles with high fuel efficiency and customer demands for performance has brought interesting changes. Computer networks and safety system complexity has grown as well.

The goal of this class is to prepare aftermarket technicians for the diagnosis and repair of the new engine control systems found on GM vehicles. During the class, we will present tips and procedures that will enable the technician to diagnose these faults quickly and accurately.

After completing this class, the technician will be able to:

  • Diagnose evaporative system faults
  • Diagnose fuel trim faults
  • Diagnose variable valve lift and timing faults
  • Understand turbocharged engine fueling and evaporative control
  • Be aware of common cooling system faults that may cause head gasket failures
  • Diagnose high and low-speed communication faults
  • Diagnose and repair common GDI faults

Strategy Based Diagnostics 

The cars we repair and the systems they contain have changed drastically. Is there a “one size fits all” strategy we can use to diagnose codes and symptoms? We think there is.

A good diagnostic technician knows how to combine experience, service information, and intuition to arrive at a theory.  That technician also has the techniques and equipment needed to prove if that theory is correct.

The goal of this class is to improve the aftermarket technician’s ability to successfully diagnose a variety of vehicle faults. In this class, we will introduce strategies for diagnostic workflow. Then, we will follow working technicians across the US as they apply their techniques to diagnose vehicles and put their strategies to work.

After completing this class, technicians will:

  • Understand differential diagnosis
  • Learn improved methods to identify fuel control and misfire faults
  • Be prepared to diagnose cam/crank correlation faults
  • Learn a strategy for diagnosing communication faults
  • Be prepared to diagnose engine mechanical faults
  • Learn a process for electrical diagnosis

Diagnosing Fuel Trim, MAF, and 02 Problems 

The next vehicle you diagnose might be equipped with an Air/Fuel or Lambda sensor. These sensors have complicated the diagnosis of fuel trim DTC and reduced power concerns. Our familiar scan data such as g/s for a mass air flow sensor, Short Term and Long Term for fuel trim, 0-1 volt for O2 sensors have been replaced with terms like kg/hr, Equivalence Ratio, Milliamps, or strange voltages that don’t make sense.

The goal of this class is to prepare aftermarket technicians to be able to streamline their diagnosis of fuel control related problems through an understanding of systems operation and the application of data and diagnostic functions. 

After completing this class, technicians will be able to:

  • Understand the difference and operation of speed density and MAF systems
  • Understand short and long term fuel control
  • Explain the basic operation and difference of oxygen sensors and air fuel ratio sensors
  • Create a fuel trim map and use it to diagnose fuel trim faults
  • Identify common problems and their solutions

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